The Resolution Law Group: Bank of America’s Countrywide to Pay $17.3M RMBS Settlement to Massachusetts

According to Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley, Countrywide Securities Corp. (CFC) will pay $17 million to settle residential mortgage backed securities claims. The settlement includes $6 million to be paid to the Commonwealth and $11.3 million to investors with the Pension Reserves Investment Management Board. Countrywide is a Bank of America (BAC) unit.

Coakley’s office was the first in the US to start probing and pursuing Wall Street securitization firms for their involvement in the subprime mortgage crisis. Other RMBS settlements Massachusetts has reached include: $34M from JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM), $36M from Barclays Bank (ADR), $52 million from Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), $102 million from Morgan Stanley (MS), and $60 million from Goldman Sachs. (GS).

Meantime, a federal judge is expected to rule soon on how much Bank of America will pay in a securities fraud verdict related to the faulty mortgages that Countrywide sold investors. A jury had found the bank and ex-Countrywide executive Rebecca Mairone liable for defrauding Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae via the sale of loans through that banking unit. The US government wants Bank of America to pay $863.6 million in damages. Mairone denies any wrongdoing.

The case focused on “High Speed Swim Lane,” a mortgage lending process that rewarded employees for the volume of loans produced rather than the quality. Checkpoints that should have made sure the loans were solid were eliminated.

In other recent Countrywide news, a federal judge has given final approval to Bank of America’s $500 million settlement with investors who say the unit misled them, which is why they even invested in high-risk mortgage debt. A number of investors, including union and public pension funds, said they were given offering documents about home loans backing the securities that they purchased and that the content of this paperwork was misleading. They contend that a lot of securities came with high credit ratings that ended up falling to “junk status” as conditions in the market deteriorated.

This payout is the biggest thus far to resolve federal class action securities litigation involving mortgage-backed securities. The second largest was the $315 million reached with Merrill Lynch (MER), which is also a Bank of America unit. That agreement was approved in 2012.

Also, Bank of America was recently named the defendant in a lawsuit filed by the California city of Los Angeles over allegedly discriminatory lending practices that the plaintiff says played a part in causing foreclosures. LA is also suing Citigroup (C) and Wells Fargo (WFC).

The city says that Bank of America offered “predatory” loan terms that led to discrimination against minority borrowers. This resulted in foreclosures that caused the City’s property-tax revenues to decline. BofA, Wells Fargo, and Citibank have said that the claims are baseless.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

Despite the fact that banks continue to enter into settlement agreements with the Government, banks are accused of continuing the illegal practice of robo-signing.

According to an investigation of local foreclosure affidavits conducted by Go Local, Bank of America, Ally Bank, CitiBank, Chase, and Wells Fargo are violating their current settlement agreement with the federal government by engaging in the wrongful practice of having people sign affidavits under penalty of perjury when the signers lack the personal knowledge required to sign the affidavits.

The investigation involved nearly 200 affidavits filed with the Registry of Deeds in Worcester and Essex Counties in Massachusetts, by or on behalf of Bank of America, Ally Bank, CitiBank, Chase, and Wells Fargo.

Geoffrey Broderick, the senior partner of the Resolution Law Group, says “Banks have been robo-signing deeds and affidavits for years.  This is not news.”  60 Minutes exposed the practice years ago, and banks and servicers admitted to the wrongdoing.  However, after being featured on 60 Minutes, people assumed that many lenders and servicers stopped the wrongful practice.  Mr. Broderick adds that “The fact that five of the nation’s largest banks continue to robo-sign after entering into a series of settlement agreements with the government demonstrates that the banks are not afraid of the government.  That is why The Resolution Law Group continues its fight against the banks.  Homeowners cannot expect the government to protect them from the banks.”

The Resolution Law Group continues to prosecute ground breaking litigation in Federal Court on behalf of homeowners suing lenders and servicers for, among other things, the illegal use of MERS, robo-signing, and intentionally ignoring underwriting standards and encouraging inflated appraisals.

The Resolution Law Group is currently enrolling clients into the pending lawsuit.  For further information, visit its website at www.TheResolutionLawGroup.com

Lender Litigation, Unlawful Foreclosure, Tarp Money, Mortgage Backed Securities, Derivitives Lawsuits, Insider Trading Lawsuit, SEC Settlements, Ponzi Scheme Lawsuits, Intentional Misrepresentation, Securitized Mortgage, Class Action Securities Lawsuit, Robo-Signing Lawsuit, Lost Equity Litigation, Mortgage Lender Fraud, FINRA Fraud Lawsuit, Suing Banks, Fraudulent Misrepresentation, Short Sale Fraud, Fraudulent Business Practices, Mortgage Litigation, Complex Tort Litigation, Injunctive Relief, MERS Fraud

Morgan Stanley Reports a Possible $1.7B in Mortgage-Backed Securities Losses

Morgan Stanley says it may sustain $1.7B in losses over a number of securities fraud cases related to subprime mortgage deals. Citigroup Inc.’s (C.N) Citibank is the plaintiff of the securities lawsuit over the Capmark VI CDO and STACK 2006-1 CDO deals, while there are 15 plaintiffs seeking punitive damages over Cheyne Finance, a structured investment vehicle. Morgan Stanley is also reporting losses over a mortgage-backed security deal involving MBIA Corp.

Our securities fraud attorneys would like you to contact us if you are someone who sustained financial losses in any of these MBS deals with Morgan Stanley. Here are more details about the cases:

• Morgan Stanley says the losses in the Citibank securities fraud lawsuit may be a minimum of $269M over a credit default swap on the Capmark VI CDO deal and another one on the credit default swap involving the STACK 2006-1 CDO deal.

• The financial firm is reporting that it may possibly incur $983 million in damages over the Cheyne deal.

• At least $223M may have been lost on an insurance contract with MBIA Corp. over a mortgage-backed security deal.

Morgan Stanley’s loss forecast doesn’t include interest, legal fees, costs, and other ancillary items. There are also other securities lawsuits involving Morgan Stanley, including:

• Allstate’s complaint over investment losses related to residential mortgage-backed securities. The insurer, who purchased over $104 million in MBS from the financial firm and its affiliates, claims that financial firm misrepresented the quality of the mortgages while claiming it had performed due diligence on the loans and mortgage originators. Many of these originators have since closed office or filed for bankruptcy and they are the defendants in government investigations/securities lawsuits.

• MBIA is suing Morgan Stanley over claims that the financial firm made misrepresentations regarding the underwriting standards of bonds that it would go on to insure. The underwriting standards are for securities based on about 5,000 subordinate-lien residential mortgages. The bond insurer claims it has already paid out tens of millions of dollars in claims that were never reimbursed.

Mortgage-Backed Securities
These debt obligations represent claims to the cash flow from mortgage loan pools. Mortgage companies, banks, and other originators put together these pools by a private, governmental, or quasi-governmental entity, which then issues securities representing claims on principal and interest payments that borrowers made on the pool’s loans. This process is called securitization. Types of MBS include pass-through participation certificates, collateralized mortgage obligations, or mortgage derivatives.

If you are an investor who suffered financial losses from investing in mortgage-backed securities, you may have reason to file a securities case against the financial firm that handled your MBS. Our stockbroker fraud lawyers have helped thousands of clients recoup their losses.  Your initial case evaluation with The Resolution Law Group is free. Our Mortgage-Backed Securities law firm represents investors throughout the US, as well as those abroad with claims against financial firms based here.

Lender Litigation, Unlawful Foreclosure, Tarp Money, Mortgage Backed Securities, Derivitives Lawsuits, Insider Trading Lawsuit, SEC Settlements, Ponzi Scheme Lawsuits, Intentional Misrepresentation, Securitized Mortgage, Class Action Securities Lawsuit, Robo-Signing Lawsuit, Lost Equity Litigation, Mortgage Lender Fraud, FINRA Fraud Lawsuit, Suing Banks, Fraudulent Misrepresentation, Short Sale Fraud, Fraudulent Business Practices, Mortgage Litigation, Complex Tort Litigation, Injunctive Relief, MERS Fraud