The Resolution Law Group: RBS Securities’ Japan Unit to Pay $50M Criminal Fine Over Libor Manipulation

A US judge has ordered Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc’s (RBS) banking unit in Japan to pay a $50 million fine over its involvement in manipulating LIBOR. RBS Securities Japan Ltd. entered a guilty plea to wire fraud as part of its parent company’s $612 million securities settlements to resolve civil and criminal charges over the rate manipulation.

On December 31, RBS Securities Japan and the US government turned in a joint court filing stating that from at least between 2006 and 2010 some of the bank’s traders tried to move Libor in a manner that would benefit their positions. The attempted manipulation of over a hundred Yen Libor submissions was reportedly involved.

Authorities say that as a result traders profited at counterparties’ expense. The filing noted that investigations uncovered wrongful behavior involving Libor submission for the yen and another currency and that about 20 RBS traders, including four at the RBS unit in Japan were involved.

Breaking down the $612 million total that RBS and RBS Securities Japan are paying to resolve these Libor claims: $325 million is from a Commodity Futures Trading Commission action, $137 million is from a U.K. Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) action. Aside from the $50 million that the RBS unit in Japan is also paying, $100M is from RBS plc.

LIBOR
LIBOR is the main benchmark for short-term interest rates around the world. It is the reference rate for a lot of interest rate contracts, credit cards, mortgages, student loans, and other lending products for consumers. Other banks have already paid fines for also allegedly manipulating LIBOR, including Deutsche Bank (DB), JPMorgan Chase (JPM), Citigroup (C), and others. Traders at these banks are accused of manipulating LIBOR to their benefit, while making themselves appear more liquid and financially healthier than what was actual. Meantime, other parties sustained losses as a result.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

The Resolution Law Group: Deutsche Bank AG Settles Shareholder Lawsuit Over Mortgage Debt

Deutsche Bank AG (DB) has settled a securities lawsuit filed by shareholders accusing the financial institution of misrepresenting the degree of risk it could manage related to mortgage debt before the financial crisis of 2008. The deal, of which the terms have not yet been revealed, were disclosed in a filing made by the firm’s lawyers in the U.S. District Court in Manhattan.

Shareholders, including two mutual funds and the Building Trades United Pension Trust Fund of Elm Grove, claim Deutsche Bank misled them about the management of risk and the underwriting on the mortgage debt that it put together and sold. They also contend that the firm was too slow to take write-downs. They believe that this resulted in an 87% decline in the bank’s share price between May 2007 and January 2009.

They also claim that Deutsche Bank maximized its profit at risk to investors, even as it failed to appraise these customers of the risks they were taking on. When the financial markets failed, it was investors that ended up paying the price.

The securities agreement was reached in the wake of a US district judge refusing to let the shareholder lawsuit become a class action case. Judge Katherine Forrest said that there were problems with the methods and conclusions arrived at by an expert that the plaintiffs had retained.

The settlement comes right after Deutsche Bank agreed to pay $1.9 billion to the Federal Housing Finance Agency over the mortgage-backed securitiesit sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. FHFA believes that the bank and other financial firms misled the two government-sponsored mortgage companies about borrowers’ creditworthiness and the quality of loans. It also contends that the firms sold Fannie and Freddie flawed securities. (The two entities, which sold these mortgage as securities to investors, suffered huge mortgage losses when the economic crisis struck in 2008.)

Also, Deutsche Bank, along with others banks, has just agreed to settle with the European Union over interbank offered rate manipulation allegations. The banks are accused of manipulating the Yen London interbank offered rate and the Euribor. Of the $2.3B in total that is to be paid, $992 million will come from Deutsche Bank.

At The Resolution Law Group, our securities lawyers are still working with institutional and individual investors to get their money back from this tumultuous time in our economic history.

Contact our securities fraud lawyers to request your free case consultation. You may have grounds for a claim involving mortgage-backed securities, residential mortgage-backed securities, auction-rate securities, real estate investment trusts, municipal bonds, and other financial instruments. You want to work with an experienced law firm that knows how to pursue your claim and is not afraid to go after the big banks.

The Resolution Law Group: Deutsche Bank, Royal Bank of Scotland Settle & Others for More than $2.3B with European Union Over Interbank Offered Rates

Deutsche Bank (DB) has announced that as part of a collective settlement, it will pay $992,329,000 to settle investigations involving interbank offered rates, including probes into the trading of Euro interest rate derivatives and interest rate derivatives for the Yen.

Also paying fines as part of the collective settlement are Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc (RBS) which will pay $535,173,000 and Society General SA (SLE), which will pay $610,454,000, and three others. In total, the financial firms will pay a record $2.3 billion.

The fines are for manipulating the Euribor and the Yen London interbank offered rate. EU Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said that regulators would continue to look into other cases linked to currency trading and Libor. Also related to these probes, Citigroup (C) has been fined $95,811,100, while JPMorgan (JPM) is paying $108M. Because of Citigroup’s cooperation into this matter, it avoided paying an additional $74.6 million. The two firms reportedly admitted that they were part of the Yen Libor financial derivatives cartel.

Almunia said that transcripts of Internet conversations exist documenting collusion between traders. According to Bloomberg News, which obtained excerpts of charts that the EU used in its investigation, one trader usually requested that a few banks set low or high fixings for a benchmark rate. (This month, Deutsche Bank barred multi-party chat rooms at its currency trading and fixed-income outfits.)

The setting of Yen Libor and European Libor were part of attempts by financial firms to make money in the financial derivatives connected to the benchmarks. Because UBS (UBS) and Barclays (BARC) notified the authorities about these activities first, they were not fined in the cartel matter, although regulators had fined them previously over Libor manipulation.

The Resolution Law Group represents institutional investors and high net worth individuals with securities claims against financial institutions, broker-dealers, investment advisers, brokers, hedge funds, mutual funds, and others. Your initial case assessment with us is free.

The Resolution Law Group: SIFMA, ISDA, and IIB Sue CFTC Over Alleged Unlawful Rulemaking Regarding Cross-Border Rules, Swap Regulations

The Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, Institute of International Bankers, and Swaps and Derivatives Association, Inc. are suing the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission over rules that they believe are hurting its members’ businesses, which includes among the biggest broker-dealers in the world. The plaintiffs contend that the agency engaged in unlawful rulemaking involving CFTC Interpretive Guidance and Policy Statements about Compliance With Certain Swap Regulations and other cross-border matters. They want the CTFC’s reach in its overseas rules curtailed.

ISDA, SIFMA, and IIB, whose members include swaps dealers such as Deutsche Bank AG (DB), Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS), JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) and many others, want to vacate a number of rules having to due with cross-border application completely. According to Bloomberg.com, at least half the largest banks work with overseas clients in their swaps business. The CFTC approved the overseas swaps guidelines this summer, and last month, two staff opinions came out shedding more light on the breadth of the guidelines.

Now, the plaintiffs are contending that with these rules the CFTC illegally circumvented the Administrative Procedure Act and Commodity Exchange Act by saying its regulations were “guidance,” did not set up cost-benefit analysis even though the law mandated it, performed a rulemaking process that was flawed, and set up rules that contradict international cooperation and could hurt global markets.

The complaint tackles the way agencies establish policies. Formal agency rules typically require commissioner votes and cost benefit-analysis. (Commissioners who vote were selected by the president and received senate confirmation.) The plaintiffs are unhappy because they say that the guidance document that came out about overseas swaps guidelines did not have economic analysis and the two advisories that were issued also lacked this analysis and were never put through a formal vote. They want the court to vacate the CFTC policy.

In a formal press release, SIFMA CEO Judd Gregg, who used to be a US Senator, said his constituents are in favor of regulatory reform that will lead to accountability and transparency in the derivatives market and that the association wants to engage constructively with regulators and for procedures to be fair and open. He called the CFTC’s handling of cross-border regulation “arbitrary… unilateral.. backdoor rulemaking.” Meantime, ISDA chairman Stephen O’Conner said that the CFTC’s current Cross-Border Rule is a “step backward” in attempts to set up a “consistent” vibrant, “global framework” regarding OTC derivatives regulation that gets rid of systemic risk.

Also commenting in the press release, IIB CEO Sally Miller noted that while the banker group’s members have made efforts to comply with CFTC regulations that were not properly adopted, still they are growing concerned with what they believe are the agency’s efforts to use “unpredictable ‘guidance documents.. directives” to regulate the global swaps market.

The Resolution Law Group represents institutional investors and high net worth individual investors in recouping their securities fraud losses.

The Resolution Law Group: JPMorgan’s Admission to CFTC of “Reckless” Trading Could Lead to More Securities Fraud Cases

According to one brokerage executive who spoke with Advisen, JPMorgan Chase & CO.’s (JPM) admission to the Commodities Futures Trading Commission when settling securities allegations over its London Whale debacle that it engaged in “reckless” trading could get the financial firm into more legal trouble with investors.

The CFTC implied that because of certain “manipulative” actions, JPMorgan managed to sell $7B in derivatives in one day, including $4.6 billion in three hours. That the term “manipulate” was used could prove useful to plaintiffs (The regulator also accused the firm of using manipulative device related to credit default swaps trading, which violated a Dodd-Frank provision prohibiting such behavior). JPMorgan will pay $100 million to settle the securities fraud cause with the agency.

With the Securities and Exchange Commission also now seeking to obtain admission of wrongdoing from defendants in certain instances, such acknowledgments to regulators could impact firm’s insurance coverage terms. Right now, standard directors and officers coverage policies exclude personal profiting, fraud, and other illegal conduct. Admissions of fraud, however, could nullify such policies.

Now, in the wake of JPMorgan’s tentative $13B residential mortgage backed securities settlement with the federal government and the possibility that the firm might take the bulk of the penalty as a tax deduction, US Representatives Luis Gutierrez (D, Ill.) and Peter Welch (D., Vt.) have introduced the “Stop Deducting Damages Act,“ which would prevent companies from being able to deduct from their taxes damages that they paid to the government. The two lawmakers have even written JPMorgan CEO James Dimon asking him to not take a tax deduction and agree to be responsible for the full payment. Also expected to speak out against JPMorgan taking any tax deduction on CFTC settlement are Americans for Tax Fairness and the US Public Interest Research Group.

The Wall Street Journal says that the firm’s earlier $5.1 million settlement with Freddie Mac (FMCC) and Fannie Mae (FNMA) will be completely tax deductible and could save JPMorgan close to $1.5 billion in taxes. The firm has declined to confirm this.

Meanwhile, government authorities are continuing with certain probes into numerous business lines at some of the biggest banks in the country, as the number of investigations, settlements, and lawsuits against the latter continue to rise in numbers. For example, there are investigators who are looking into possible global foreign-exchange markets manipulation involving UBS (UBS), Credit Suisse (CS), Barclays, Deutsche Bank (DB), Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), Citigroup (C), and JPMorgan.

Also under the microscope is Bank of America (BAC). The bank said that a US attorney intends to recommend that the Department of Justice file a civil RMBS lawsuit against it. The group looking into this matter is made up federal and state prosecutors. According to one source, they are also conducting similar probes into several other banks, including Citigroup, Wells Fargo (WFC), UBS (UBS), Goldman Sachs (GS), RBS, Morgan Stanley (MS), Credit Suisse, and Deutsche Bank.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase Among Banks Sued by Danish Pension Funds in Credit Default Swaps Lawsuit

In U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Danish pension funds (and their investment manager) Unipension Fondsmaeglerselskab, MP Pension-Pensionskassen for Magistre & Psykologer, Arkitekternes Pensionskasse, and Pensionskassen for Jordbrugsakademikere & Dyrlaeger are suing 12 banks accusing them of conspiring to take charge of access and pricing in the credit derivatives markets. They are claiming antitrust violations while contending that the defendants acted unreasonably to hold back competitors in the credit default swapsmarket.

The funds believe that the harm suffered by investors as a result was “tens of billions of dollars” worth. They want monetary damages and injunctive relief.

According to the Danish pension funds’ credit default swapscase, the defendants inflated profits by taking control of intellectual property rights in the CDS market, blocking would-be exchanges’ entry, and limiting client access to credit-default-swaps prices, and

This securities case comes four years after the US Justice Department acknowledged that it had begun an investigation into possible anticompetitive activities involving credit derivatives clearing, and trading (a probe that is ongoing) and just a few months after the Sheet Metal Workers Local No. 33 Cleveland District Pension Plan sued the banks, Markit, and ISDA also for allegedly taking control of the CDS market, which it says resulted in customers being overcharged some $7 billion annually. The plaintiff contends that there may be billions of dollars in damages and it wants treble damages. Last month, it was the European Commission’s turn to claim that 13 banks, ISDA, and Markit worked together to stop CDSs from being able to trade on open exchanges.

If you think you may have been the victim of securities fraud involving credit default swaps, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

There are over a dozen defendants in the Danish pension funds’ CDS fraud case including:

J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. (JPM)
Citigroup Inc. (C)
Morgan Stanley (MS)
Bank of America Corp. (BAC)
Credit Suisse Group AG (CS)
Deutsche Bank AG (DB)
UBS AG (UBS)
• Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC (RBS)
Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS)
Markit Group Ltd, a financial data provider
• International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA)

The Resolution Law Group: The housing market will continue to suffer until it is fixed by the Courts or the Legislature.

When lawyers for the City of Los Angeles filed a lawsuit against Deutsche Bank two years ago, they criticized the world’s fourth-largest bank as among the city’s worst slumlord and sought hundreds of millions of dollars in penalties and restitution.

Despite the fanfare and rhetoric when the case was brought, the city of Los Angeles just announced that it settled with Deutsche Bank for only ten million dollars and that the settlement money was not going to be paid by the bank.

Geoffrey Broderick, the senior partner of the Resolution Law Group, says “Deutsche Bank foreclosed on more than 2,000 homes in metropolitan Los Angeles between 2007 and 2011. Many homes fell into disrepair and crime increased in the neighborhoods where the foreclosures took place. “

Mr. Broderick adds that “The housing market will continue to suffer until it is fixed by the Courts or the Legislature. Somebody has to fix the problem. That is why The Resolution Law Group continues its fight for homeowners. Homeowners cannot expect the problem to fix itself.”

The Resolution Law Group continues to prosecute ground breaking litigation in Federal Court on behalf of homeowners suing lenders and servicers for, among other things, the illegal use of MERS, robo-signing, and intentionally ignoring underwriting standards and encouraging inflated appraisals.

The Resolution Law Group is currently enrolling clients into the pending lawsuit. For further information, visit its website at www.TheResolutionLawGroup.com

If you feel you are the victim of Mortgage Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

Lender Litigation, Unlawful Foreclosure, Tarp Money, Mortgage Backed Securities, Derivitives Lawsuits, Insider Trading Lawsuit, SEC Settlements, Ponzi Scheme Lawsuits, Intentional Misrepresentation, Securitized Mortgage, Class Action Securities Lawsuit, Robo-Signing Lawsuit, Lost Equity Litigation, Mortgage Lender Fraud, FINRA Fraud Lawsuit, Suing Banks, Fraudulent Misrepresentation, Short Sale Fraud, Fraudulent Business Practices, Mortgage Litigation, Complex Tort Litigation, Injunctive Relief, MERS Fraud