The Resolution Law Group: Bank of America’s Countrywide to Pay $17.3M RMBS Settlement to Massachusetts

According to Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley, Countrywide Securities Corp. (CFC) will pay $17 million to settle residential mortgage backed securities claims. The settlement includes $6 million to be paid to the Commonwealth and $11.3 million to investors with the Pension Reserves Investment Management Board. Countrywide is a Bank of America (BAC) unit.

Coakley’s office was the first in the US to start probing and pursuing Wall Street securitization firms for their involvement in the subprime mortgage crisis. Other RMBS settlements Massachusetts has reached include: $34M from JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM), $36M from Barclays Bank (ADR), $52 million from Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), $102 million from Morgan Stanley (MS), and $60 million from Goldman Sachs. (GS).

Meantime, a federal judge is expected to rule soon on how much Bank of America will pay in a securities fraud verdict related to the faulty mortgages that Countrywide sold investors. A jury had found the bank and ex-Countrywide executive Rebecca Mairone liable for defrauding Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae via the sale of loans through that banking unit. The US government wants Bank of America to pay $863.6 million in damages. Mairone denies any wrongdoing.

The case focused on “High Speed Swim Lane,” a mortgage lending process that rewarded employees for the volume of loans produced rather than the quality. Checkpoints that should have made sure the loans were solid were eliminated.

In other recent Countrywide news, a federal judge has given final approval to Bank of America’s $500 million settlement with investors who say the unit misled them, which is why they even invested in high-risk mortgage debt. A number of investors, including union and public pension funds, said they were given offering documents about home loans backing the securities that they purchased and that the content of this paperwork was misleading. They contend that a lot of securities came with high credit ratings that ended up falling to “junk status” as conditions in the market deteriorated.

This payout is the biggest thus far to resolve federal class action securities litigation involving mortgage-backed securities. The second largest was the $315 million reached with Merrill Lynch (MER), which is also a Bank of America unit. That agreement was approved in 2012.

Also, Bank of America was recently named the defendant in a lawsuit filed by the California city of Los Angeles over allegedly discriminatory lending practices that the plaintiff says played a part in causing foreclosures. LA is also suing Citigroup (C) and Wells Fargo (WFC).

The city says that Bank of America offered “predatory” loan terms that led to discrimination against minority borrowers. This resulted in foreclosures that caused the City’s property-tax revenues to decline. BofA, Wells Fargo, and Citibank have said that the claims are baseless.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

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The Resolution Law Group: NCUA Sues Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan, UBS, & Other Banks Over $2.7B in Allegedly Fraudulent RMBS Sales to Credit Unions

The National Credit Union Administration has filed residential mortgage-backed securities lawsuits against JPMorgan (JPM), Morgan Stanley (MS), UBS (UBS), Royal Bank of Scotland Group (RBS), Barclays (BARC), and Credit Suisse (CS) accusing the financial firms of selling $2.7 billion of these fraudulent securities to the credit unions. The Members United Corporate Federal Credit Union and Southwest Corporate Federal Credit Union paid over $416 million for the RMBS in the case against Morgan Stanley and $1.9 billion from the other defendants. One of the credit unions contends that Wachovia (WB), Goldman Sachs (GS), Ally Securities and Wells Fargo (WFC) also defrauded it.

According to the NCUA’s RMBS fraud lawsuits, the investment banks issued misrepresentations related to the underwriting and sale of the securities. Offering documents allegedly contained false statements or omitted facts that were material. The government regulator is accusing the originators of systematically ignoring underlying guidelines in offering documents, which made the mortgage-backed securities’ risks higher than what was presented.

The MBS fraud lawsuits make claims under state and federal securities laws. Whatever is recovered will go toward the Temporary Corporate Credit Union Stabilization Fund.

Already, NCUA has settled RMBS fraud lawsuits against Bank of America (BAC), Citibank (C), Deutsche Bank (DB), and HSBC for more than $335 million.

Contact The resolution Law Group. Our institutional investor fraud law firm to find out whether you have grounds for securities case. Your RMBS fraud case consultation is free.

Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase Among Banks Sued by Danish Pension Funds in Credit Default Swaps Lawsuit

In U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Danish pension funds (and their investment manager) Unipension Fondsmaeglerselskab, MP Pension-Pensionskassen for Magistre & Psykologer, Arkitekternes Pensionskasse, and Pensionskassen for Jordbrugsakademikere & Dyrlaeger are suing 12 banks accusing them of conspiring to take charge of access and pricing in the credit derivatives markets. They are claiming antitrust violations while contending that the defendants acted unreasonably to hold back competitors in the credit default swapsmarket.

The funds believe that the harm suffered by investors as a result was “tens of billions of dollars” worth. They want monetary damages and injunctive relief.

According to the Danish pension funds’ credit default swapscase, the defendants inflated profits by taking control of intellectual property rights in the CDS market, blocking would-be exchanges’ entry, and limiting client access to credit-default-swaps prices, and

This securities case comes four years after the US Justice Department acknowledged that it had begun an investigation into possible anticompetitive activities involving credit derivatives clearing, and trading (a probe that is ongoing) and just a few months after the Sheet Metal Workers Local No. 33 Cleveland District Pension Plan sued the banks, Markit, and ISDA also for allegedly taking control of the CDS market, which it says resulted in customers being overcharged some $7 billion annually. The plaintiff contends that there may be billions of dollars in damages and it wants treble damages. Last month, it was the European Commission’s turn to claim that 13 banks, ISDA, and Markit worked together to stop CDSs from being able to trade on open exchanges.

If you think you may have been the victim of securities fraud involving credit default swaps, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

There are over a dozen defendants in the Danish pension funds’ CDS fraud case including:

J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. (JPM)
Citigroup Inc. (C)
Morgan Stanley (MS)
Bank of America Corp. (BAC)
Credit Suisse Group AG (CS)
Deutsche Bank AG (DB)
UBS AG (UBS)
• Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC (RBS)
Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS)
Markit Group Ltd, a financial data provider
• International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA)

Freddie Mac Sues Big Banks Over Rate Rigging

It’s the government-controlled mortgage finance company versus Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, UBS, Credit Suisse Group, and many others. Freddie Mac says they all worked together to rig LIBOR – the benchmark rate used to establish interest rates on everything from mortgage loans to credit cards.

If you need some background on LIBOR or the scandal surrounding it, check out our story from last summer. But all you really need to know is that big banks were caught manipulating the rate to their advantage, in many cases for years, forcing millions to pay inflated interest on all kinds of loans, all over the world.

Many banks have already been fined hundreds of millions of dollars: Barclays paid the British and U.S. governments $453 million; UBS paid $1.5 billion; the Royal Bank of Scotland, $612 million.

And now Freddie Mac, which has major investments in mortgage-related securities affected by LIBOR, wants some payback too. A week ago, the mortgage company sued more than a dozen banks for unspecified damages. Reuters reports the bank shenanigans may have cost the company more than $3 billion.

If you, your family, friends, neighbors or associates have been subjected to Mortgage Fraud, please contact The Resolution Law Group at (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

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