The Resolution Law Group: Bank of America’s Countrywide to Pay $17.3M RMBS Settlement to Massachusetts

According to Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley, Countrywide Securities Corp. (CFC) will pay $17 million to settle residential mortgage backed securities claims. The settlement includes $6 million to be paid to the Commonwealth and $11.3 million to investors with the Pension Reserves Investment Management Board. Countrywide is a Bank of America (BAC) unit.

Coakley’s office was the first in the US to start probing and pursuing Wall Street securitization firms for their involvement in the subprime mortgage crisis. Other RMBS settlements Massachusetts has reached include: $34M from JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM), $36M from Barclays Bank (ADR), $52 million from Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), $102 million from Morgan Stanley (MS), and $60 million from Goldman Sachs. (GS).

Meantime, a federal judge is expected to rule soon on how much Bank of America will pay in a securities fraud verdict related to the faulty mortgages that Countrywide sold investors. A jury had found the bank and ex-Countrywide executive Rebecca Mairone liable for defrauding Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae via the sale of loans through that banking unit. The US government wants Bank of America to pay $863.6 million in damages. Mairone denies any wrongdoing.

The case focused on “High Speed Swim Lane,” a mortgage lending process that rewarded employees for the volume of loans produced rather than the quality. Checkpoints that should have made sure the loans were solid were eliminated.

In other recent Countrywide news, a federal judge has given final approval to Bank of America’s $500 million settlement with investors who say the unit misled them, which is why they even invested in high-risk mortgage debt. A number of investors, including union and public pension funds, said they were given offering documents about home loans backing the securities that they purchased and that the content of this paperwork was misleading. They contend that a lot of securities came with high credit ratings that ended up falling to “junk status” as conditions in the market deteriorated.

This payout is the biggest thus far to resolve federal class action securities litigation involving mortgage-backed securities. The second largest was the $315 million reached with Merrill Lynch (MER), which is also a Bank of America unit. That agreement was approved in 2012.

Also, Bank of America was recently named the defendant in a lawsuit filed by the California city of Los Angeles over allegedly discriminatory lending practices that the plaintiff says played a part in causing foreclosures. LA is also suing Citigroup (C) and Wells Fargo (WFC).

The city says that Bank of America offered “predatory” loan terms that led to discrimination against minority borrowers. This resulted in foreclosures that caused the City’s property-tax revenues to decline. BofA, Wells Fargo, and Citibank have said that the claims are baseless.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

The Resolution Law Group: Wells Fargo Reaches $591 Million Mortgage Deal with Fannie Mae

Wells Fargo & Co. (WFC) has arrived at a $591 million mortgage settlement with Fannie Mae (FNMA). The arrangement resolves claims that the banking institution sold faulty mortgages to the government run-home loan financier and covers loans that Wells Fargo originated more than four years ago.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (FMCC) were taken over by the US government five years ago as they stood poised to fail due to faulty loans they bought from Wells Fargo and other banks. The two mortgage companies had bundled the mortgages with securities.

With this deal, Wells Fargo will pay $541 million in cash to Fannie Mae while the rest will be taken care of in credits from previous buy backs.

It was just a couple of months ago that Wells Fargo settled its disputes over faulty loans it sold to Freddie Mac with an $869 million mortgage buyback deal. According to Compass Point Research and Trading LLC, between 2005 and 2008, Wells Fargo sold $345 billion of mortgages to Freddie Mac. Compass says the bank sold another $126 billion to Freddie in 2009.

Also settling with Freddie Mac today is Flagstar Bank (FBC) for $10.8M over loans it sold to the mortgage company between 2000 and 2008. That agreement comes following Flagstar and Fannie Mae settling mortgage claims for $93 million over loans the former sold to the latter between January 2000 and December 31, 2008.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have been trying to get banks to repurchase these trouble loans for some time now. In light of this latest settlement with Wells Fargo, Fannie Mae has reached settlements of about $6.5 billion over loan buy backs, including a $3.6 billion deal with Bank of America Corp. (BAC) and Countrywide Financial Corp. and $968 million with Citigroup (C). Earlier this month, Deutsche Bank (DB) consented to pay $1.9 billion to the Federal Housing Finance Agency over claims that it misled Freddie and Fannie about the mortgage backed securities that the latter two purchased from the bank.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

AIG Settles Ex-Executive’s $274M Lawsuit Over Alleged Failure to Pay Him During 2008 Economic Crisis

American Insurance Group (AIG) and one of its ex-executives, Kevin Fitzpatrick, have reached a settlement deal over his $274 million lawsuit against the insurer. Fitzpatrick, the former president of the AIG Global Real Estate Investment Corp. unit, claims that his then-employer would not pay him during the 2008 economic crisis. The insurer’s refusal to pay occurred not long after the US government said yes to the first part of what would turn into a $182 billion bailout.

Fitzpatrick, who worked for AIG for 22 years, said that AIG breached agreements it had with him and entities under his control. He claims the agreements entitled him to a share of profits made on the insurer’s real estate investments but that on October 2008 AIG stopped paying him and others who were entitled to profit distributions. Fitzpatrick then quit.

Fitzpatrick sued in 2009, claiming that AIG owed him $274 million and that he wanted interest and punitive damages, which is right around the time that the insurer was trying to get past public disapproval over $165 million in bonuses that were paid to employees in the AIG Financial Products unit. That is the group that handled the complex financial instruments that led to its huge losses.

AIG denied wrongdoing and said that Fitzpatrick was paid what he was owed. The insurer contended that Fitzpatrick actually was fired and that he stole data that was confidential and belonged to the company.

In other AIG-related news, a district court judge just threw out a shareholder lawsuit accusing Bank of America (BAC) of not telling them that the insurer was planning to sue the bank with a $10 billion fraud lawsuit. AIG accused Bank of America of misrepresenting the quality of more than $28 million of MBSs that AIG bought from the latter and its Countrywide and Merrill Lynch (MER) units.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

The Resolution Law Group: Judge Dismisses Shareholder Lawsuit Suing Bank of America For Allegedly Concealing AIG Fraud Case

A judge has thrown out a securities lawsuit by shareholders accusing Bank of America Corp. (BAC) of concealing that insurer AIG (AIG) intended to file a $10 billion fraud case against it. U.S. District Judge John Koeltl in Manhattan said that BofA and four of its officers were not obligated to reveal in advance that the lawsuit was pending or that it was a large one.

AIG filed its securities fraud lawsuit against Bank of America in 2011. The insurer claimed that the bank misrepresented the quality of over $28 billion of mortgage-backed securities it purchased not just from the bank but also from its Merrill Lynch (MER) and Countrywide units. On the day that the complaint was filed, shares of Bank of America dropped 20.3% and Standard & Poor’s revoked the tripe-A credit rating it had issued.

The shareholder plaintiffs claim that the bank’s officers, including Chief Executive Brian Moynihan, knew about the MBS fraud case six months before the lawsuit was submitted and they should have given them advance warning.

Judge John Koeltl, however, said that the specifics about the securities case did not materially differ from what Bank of America already disclosed in its mortgage exposures. He also determined that the bank did not issue inaccurate or incomplete statements.

AIG’s mortgage-backed securities lawsuit is still pending.

Meantime, the media is reporting that the AIG may be getting ready to file another MBS fraud case, this one against Morgan Stanley (MS). The case would be over the $3.7 billion of mortgage securities that the bank sponsored and underwrote between 2005 to 2007 that AIG then bought. The insurer has submitted a regulatory filing about its plans to possibly file. AIG ended a “tolling agreement” with the firm that would have allowed them to resolve their disagreement outside a courtroom.

The Resolution Law Group’s mortgage-backed securities lawyers represent institutional and individual investors that have sustained financial losses because of securities fraud. Contact our MBS fraud law firm today.

Judge Dismisses Suit Against Bank of America For Not Disclosing AIG Claims, Insurance Journal, November 4, 2013

The Resolution Law Group: JPMorgan’s Admission to CFTC of “Reckless” Trading Could Lead to More Securities Fraud Cases

According to one brokerage executive who spoke with Advisen, JPMorgan Chase & CO.’s (JPM) admission to the Commodities Futures Trading Commission when settling securities allegations over its London Whale debacle that it engaged in “reckless” trading could get the financial firm into more legal trouble with investors.

The CFTC implied that because of certain “manipulative” actions, JPMorgan managed to sell $7B in derivatives in one day, including $4.6 billion in three hours. That the term “manipulate” was used could prove useful to plaintiffs (The regulator also accused the firm of using manipulative device related to credit default swaps trading, which violated a Dodd-Frank provision prohibiting such behavior). JPMorgan will pay $100 million to settle the securities fraud cause with the agency.

With the Securities and Exchange Commission also now seeking to obtain admission of wrongdoing from defendants in certain instances, such acknowledgments to regulators could impact firm’s insurance coverage terms. Right now, standard directors and officers coverage policies exclude personal profiting, fraud, and other illegal conduct. Admissions of fraud, however, could nullify such policies.

Now, in the wake of JPMorgan’s tentative $13B residential mortgage backed securities settlement with the federal government and the possibility that the firm might take the bulk of the penalty as a tax deduction, US Representatives Luis Gutierrez (D, Ill.) and Peter Welch (D., Vt.) have introduced the “Stop Deducting Damages Act,“ which would prevent companies from being able to deduct from their taxes damages that they paid to the government. The two lawmakers have even written JPMorgan CEO James Dimon asking him to not take a tax deduction and agree to be responsible for the full payment. Also expected to speak out against JPMorgan taking any tax deduction on CFTC settlement are Americans for Tax Fairness and the US Public Interest Research Group.

The Wall Street Journal says that the firm’s earlier $5.1 million settlement with Freddie Mac (FMCC) and Fannie Mae (FNMA) will be completely tax deductible and could save JPMorgan close to $1.5 billion in taxes. The firm has declined to confirm this.

Meanwhile, government authorities are continuing with certain probes into numerous business lines at some of the biggest banks in the country, as the number of investigations, settlements, and lawsuits against the latter continue to rise in numbers. For example, there are investigators who are looking into possible global foreign-exchange markets manipulation involving UBS (UBS), Credit Suisse (CS), Barclays, Deutsche Bank (DB), Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), Citigroup (C), and JPMorgan.

Also under the microscope is Bank of America (BAC). The bank said that a US attorney intends to recommend that the Department of Justice file a civil RMBS lawsuit against it. The group looking into this matter is made up federal and state prosecutors. According to one source, they are also conducting similar probes into several other banks, including Citigroup, Wells Fargo (WFC), UBS (UBS), Goldman Sachs (GS), RBS, Morgan Stanley (MS), Credit Suisse, and Deutsche Bank.

If you feel you are the victim of Securities Fraud, please do not hesitate to email or call the The Resolution Law Group (203) 542-7275 for a confidential, no obligation consultation.

The Resolution Law Group: It has been a very good week for AIG in California litigation. AIG prevailed in the publicized Michael Jackson trial. Less publicized, but probably more valuable to AIG is the recent ruling by a Federal Judge in the central district of California.

It has been a very good week for AIG in California litigation. AIG prevailed in the publicized Michael Jackson trial. Less publicized, but probably more valuable to AIG is the recent ruling by a Federal Judge in the central district of California.

AIG previously sued Bank of America over fraudulent mortgage securities. Bank of America argued that AIG had no standing to sue because it had transferred that right when it sold the instruments to the federal Reserve Bank of New York in 2008.

Geoffrey Broderick, the senior partner of the Resolution Law Group, says “Judge Pfaelzer’s finding that AIG has standing to sue Bank of America may also be bad news for other banks that sold troubled mortgage securities to the insurer. AIG has not yet sued other institutions, but we know from public records that AIG suffered at least $11 Billion in losses involving other banks.”

Mr. Broderick adds that “The housing market will continue to suffer until it is fixed by the Courts or the Legislature. Somebody has to fix the problem. That is why The Resolution Law Group continues its fight for homeowners. Homeowners cannot expect the problem to fix itself.”

The Resolution Law Group continues to prosecute ground breaking litigation in Federal Court on behalf of homeowners suing lenders and servicers for, among other things, the illegal use of MERS, robo-signing, and intentionally ignoring underwriting standards and encouraging inflated appraisals.

The Resolution Law Group is currently enrolling clients into the pending lawsuit. For further information, visit its website at www.TheResolutionLawGroup.com

The Resolution Law Group: In a trial now pending in the U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan), The Government is suing Bank of America’s Countrywide unit for issuing defective mortgages and then selling them to Fannie Mae.

In a trial now pending in the U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan), The Government is suing Bank of America’s Countrywide unit for issuing defective mortgages and then selling them to Fannie Mae.

An ex-Countrywide employee has testified that pursuant to the company’s “High Speed Swim Lane” program, loan applications were pushed through without taking the time to evaluate the application. Evidence was presented at trial showing that the entire review process for one loan was 13 minutes, from beginning to end. The review process began at 3:53 pm and the loan was “cleared to close” at 4:06pm!

Geoffrey Broderick, the senior partner of the Resolution Law Group, says “Obviously, the review process must take more than 13 minutes to complete. A bank employee would have to review, at a minimum, title searches, deeds, taxes, a review of the applicant’s credit and employment history, a determination of whether the home was located in a flood zone, property appraisals, and a comparison with similar properties, among other things.“

Mr. Broderick adds that “The housing market will continue to suffer until it is fixed by the Courts or the Legislature. Somebody has to fix the problem. That is why The Resolution Law Group continues its fight for homeowners. Homeowners cannot expect the problem to fix itself.”

The Resolution Law Group continues to prosecute ground breaking litigation in Federal Court on behalf of homeowners suing lenders and servicers for, among other things, the illegal use of MERS, robo-signing, and intentionally ignoring underwriting standards and encouraging inflated appraisals.

The Resolution Law Group is currently enrolling clients into the pending lawsuit. For further information, visit its website at www.TheResolutionLawGroup.com.